Thursday, December 21, 2006

I submitted my PhD thesis, and all I got was this crappy balloon



Well, it's not really all that crappy ... the balloon is a nice happy gesture to mark the occasion. I even got to pick the colour. It took me far too long to write and submit this thing, it's a relief to not have to look at it for a few months. My thesis, entitled "The structure of outer mitochondrial protein import receptors", may well be the first Creative Commons Licensed thesis submitted in Australia (although I doubt it) . Once it's been examined (hopefully I pass), I'll release it online and allow everyone to poke holes and rip it to shreds (or they can poke at the associated peer reviewed publication instead .. unfortunately it's probably not Open Access).

Afterthought: One thing that slowed down the final submission was the bloody Latex typesetting. I'm a Latex novice, and while I really like the final result, Latex is an abomination (much like Perl).



Update, 15th October, 2007.

I've finally got around to submitting the final post-examination version of my thesis to the University of Melbourne ePrints server. You can get a PDF copy of my thesis here. I used the xmpincl Latex macro to embed XMP Creative Commons licensing data into the final PDF version generated by pdflatex. I probably didn't get the format of the licensing XML exactly right, but I'm sure it will be good enough that search engines can (or will one day) determine the correct licensing for the work.

3 comments:

Greg said...

Congratulations. Now you just have to wait for the reviews to come back :)

Andrew Perry said...

Thanks Greg ... the nightmares have already started :) (I woke up this morning from a dream that I had written something into the text like " ... rushing to get this done before Christmas ..." . I'm pretty sure I didn't write anything like that, but I'm not game to look at the copy I have).

Pedro Beltrão said...

Congratulations !! :) I am also submitting soon. Thankfully I do not have to wait for comments but I will have to defend with an oral presentation.